2012 Vol4 No2 RONNEY Content


Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109
HISTORY IS MADE AS WOMAN IS ELECTED TO CHAIR AU THE FIRST TIME

As the fight and struggle to know who will be chairing the African Union (AU) goes, the tension, the fever and the drama was another issue you need to know as many thought that the struggle for the members all seat might cost a lot of problem for the continuous unity of the African Union but to surprise those wishing this, the incumbent Chairman Jean Ping of Garbon who has been ruling since 2008, and was now defeated by Dr. Mrs Nkosazana Olamini Zuma, (who is known as Madam Zuma) accepted defeat and congratulate her. However, hear the view and opinions of the African Media and its friends and Foreign Media :

\African Union choose first female leader

Dlamini Zuma, South Africa's Home Affairs Minister, beats incumbent Jean Ping of Gabon to end months of deadlock ·Elissa Jobson in Addis Ababa

·The Guardian, Monday, 160 July, 2012 11.22 BST

Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma is the first woman to lead the continent and the first from Southern Africa since the AU's predecessor was founded in 1963. Photograph: Micheal/Micheal/Xinhua Press Corbis

A South African politician has become the first female leader of the African Union (AU), ending months of bitter deadlock at the continental body.

Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, South Africa's Home Affairs minister, was elected chair of the African Union Commission on Sunday at a Summit of Heads of State and Government in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Cheering broke out at the AU's headquarter as supporters of Dlamini Zuma 63, celebrated her victory over the incumbent, Jean Ping of Gabon. “We made it!” a grinning Zimbabwe delegate shouted, reflecting the strong support Dlamini Zuma's candidacy received from fellow members of the Southern African Development Community.

The South African President, Jacob Zuma, former husband of the winning candidate, emerged from the conference hall where the voting had taken place to announce that “Africa is happy!”. Her victory would empower women, he added. Dlamini-Zuma's is the first to lead the continent since the Organisation of African Unity, later the AU, was founded in 1963. She is also the first from Southern Africa. She faces the challenge of revitalizing a body often criticized for its slow and ineffective response to crises such as those in Ivory Coast and Libya last year. Dlamini-Zuma's victory was far from certain. She had stood against Ping in elections in January, which ended in a stalemate that extended Ping's term in office by a further six months until a fresh ballot could be held.

In this first contest, neither candidate managed to secure the two-thirds majority needed for an outright win but Ping garnered slightly more support than his opponent.

Many observers felt it would be difficult for Dlamini-Zuma to overcome the widespread discontent with South Africa for breaking the unwritten convention that the five largest contributors to the AU budget Nigeria, Egypt, Libya, Algeria and South Africa should not contest the commission's highest office.

Both Nigeria and Egypt, whose strategic interests would not have been served by a South African victory, were strongly in the Ping camp. There are concerns that South Africa, the continent's biggest economy, will use its position as AU chair to further its efforts to secure a permanent African seat on an expanded UN Security Council.

There had also been widespread skepticism in the South African Press, which branded the country's campaign “quixotic”.

But hard lobbying from the South African government and its regional partners turned the tide for Dlamini-Zuma. The campaign became personal towards the end of the content with tempers flaring on both sides. Ping made an angry riposte to allegations in the South African press regarding his candidacy and campaign financing last week that lost him critical support.

His chances of victory were further undermined by the absence of two of his key champions the continued threat of attack from Islamist militants kept the Nigerian President, Goodluck Jonathan, at home, while Meles Zenawi, Ethiopia's Prime Minister and the summit's host, has yet to make an appearance at the meeting and is rumored to be seriously ill and receiving treatment in Europe. As in January, the election went the distance. In the first round, Dlamini-Zuma had a narrow advantage, beating Ping by 27 votes to 24. In the second, she extended her lead gaining two more votes. By the third she was just one vote short of the 34 needed to secure a two-thirds majority. She contested the fourth and final alone and managed to succeed where Ping had failed, winning support from 37 out of the 51 eligible member states.

Yoweri Museveni, President of Uganda, welcomed the result, believing Dlamini-Zuma will be a strong advocate for the continent. “We are used to diplomats and bureaucrats,” he said. “Her background as a freedom fighter, this is value addition.”

He felt that the rifts exposed by the election had been healed “because we agreed” on Dlamini-Zuma.

Zuma concurred. “I think the AU had done the right thing,” he said. “Southern Africa is happy and the whole of Africa is happy.” The appointment of Zuma's ex-wife removes her as potential focal point for opposition to his candidacy before elections in South Africa in 2014.

Before the voting, rumours spread of a compromise. The third candidate. Mohammed Ibn Chambas, a former president of the West African regional block Ecowas, and Joaquim Chissamo, the ex-president of Mozambique, were among those named.

Erastus Mwencha, a Kenyan, the Vice-Chairman of the AU Commission, was re-elected to serve a second term. His support was almost unanimous, with 50 out of a possible 51 votes and his victory breaks another unwritten convention that dictates that the chair and vice-chair are held by one Francophone and one Anglophone country. At a press conference before the election, Dlamini-Zuma said that if appointed hair she would assess “what is not working well and what can be strengthened.”

Challenge Ahead for New AU Commission Chairwoman Newly-elected South African minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma as first female Head of the African Union (AU) Commission, speaks during a press conference, July 16, 2012.

* Analysts: Serious Challenges Await First Woman AU Chair * Dlamini-Zuma Sworn in as First Female Leader of the AU Commission * AU Chief Leaves Mixed Legacy A finale confidence vote of 37 in favour gave her the 60 per cent majority she needed to be elected.

“Now we have the African Union chair Madame Zuma, who will preside over the destiny of this institution,” Benin's president and current AU chairman Thomas Boni Yayi said.

The contest to head the Commission of the 54m4mb45 AU had been deadlocked since last year, with neither Dlamini-Zuma nor Ping winning a two-thirds majority.

It pitted French-speaking states, largely backing Ping, against mostly English-speaking countries, especially in South Africa, which gave their support to Dlamini-Zuma.

'Means a lot for Africa'

Her former husband, South African President Jacob Zuma, was one of the first to offer congratulations after the vote.

“It means a lot for Africa …. for the continent, unity and the empowerment of women,” Zuma said. The impasse over the candidates had persisted through a summit of AU Heads of State held in Addis Ababa at the weekend. It prompted Iyayi to warn that failure by the continental body to resolve the leadership deadlock would divide it and undermine its credibility in the world. Critics say the AU showed itself hesitant and slow-moving in its response to the conflicts last year in Libya and Ivory Coast, allowing Western governments to take lead roles.

“She's a freedom fighter, not a bureaucrat or a diplomat,” said Uganda President, Yoweri Museveni.

Noureddine Mezni, spokesperson for the elections for the outgoing chairman, told the AFP news agency that Ping had acknowledged defeat:

''He has accepted the results of the elections and wishes Madame Dlamini-Zuma the very best … he expressed his readiness to co-operate with her to work together for the unity of the continent,” Mezni said.

Some analysts say South Africa have violated an unwritten tradition that continental powerhouses do not run candidates for the, but leave smaller nations to take the job. Before the vote, however, Dlamini-Zuma played down concerns that the vote could divide the AU.

“I don't think the continent will be polarized,” she said.

The winner would “make sure they work with everybody, irrespective of where and who they voted for” she added.

Jakkie Cilliers of the South Africa-based Institute for Security Studies said she will be “an inclusive chair, she won't be divisive … she was a very competent foreign minister and even better at home affairs.”

Marthe Van Der Wolf

October 11, 2012 ADDIS ABABA Nkosazana Dlamini_Zuma takes office as the new chairperson of the African Union Commission on Monday.

South African Home Affairs minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma is the first woman to hold the position of AU Commission Chair. She was elected to head the AU's executive arm in July after a bruising battle with incumbent Jean Ping, which showed the division between French-speaking African states and the Southern African Development Community.

In time, it may prove to be the easiest challenge she'll face in the African Union. Pressing issues

As her tenure starts, Dlamini-Zuma's most pressing policy issues are tackling support for a military intervention in northern Mali-where Islamist militants have taken control after an April coup and a growing rebellion in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

Internally, the 63-year-old will need to heal divisions brought out in her successful leadership fight and fears that the continent's economic powerhouse, South Africa, will try to dominate the 54-member body.

Major-General Chris Pepani, the South African ambassador to the African Union, worked with Dlamini-Zuma when she was Minister of Foreign Affairs from 1999 to 2009. He describes her style of leadership as firm. “She is a very strategic thinker, a person that I could describe as a person of substance,” he said. “And, she is a person of detail and she is a person that walks the talk. She believes in things being delivered. She is a very kind person, but very firm person”.

Biography

Dlamini-Zuma has served in various ministerial posts in South Africa since the end of apartheid in 1994. She was the Health Minister under President Nelson Mandela, Foreign Affairs Minister under President Thabo Mbeki and Home Affairs Minister under ex-husband, President Jacob Zuma. Critics of the long-time politician, who is also a medical doctor, point on her controversial positions against anti-retroviral drugs as hindering the fight to reduce South Africa's AIDS rate, which is still the highest in the world.

But Dlamini-Zuma also had many successes in her political career, making her popular in South Africa. She has been praised for desegregating the health care system after the end of apartheid, and providing free access to basic health care for the poor. She also turned around the department of home affairs, which used to be known as one of the most mismanaged ministries in South Africa. Despite these achievements, independent African Union expert Mehari Taddle Maru says being a leader in a pan-Africanist organisation is different.

“You have a different set up, a different mandate and different actors playing, different political dynamics,” said Maru. “So we cannot transpose what she has achieved in South Africa will be the same thing, the same manner, the same approach will work in the African Union”. Dlamini-Zuma's Goals: Dlamini-Zuma has said she will make the African Union a more effective organisation. Mehari says she will have to make four changes to deliver on that promise:

“The first thing she should push is we should stop policy formulation, we should stop norm setting and start policy implementation,” said Mehari. “The second area is there are procedures. The bureaucracy internally has to change. It takes on average three years to recruit one person. The third is implementation of budget.

“The program budget implementation of a program is 39 percent,” continued Mehari. “Almost 61 percent is not used. The forth area is of course recruitment. It has 50 percent of the staff that was approved in 2003.” Much attention will be focused on her gender as the first woman. Bience Gawanas, the outgoing AU Commissioner of Social Affairs who has known Dlamini-Zuma for a long time thinks is extremely significant that a woman will now take office as chairperson, but points out that she was not chosen because of her gender. “The particular woman that was elected is a former Minister of Foreign Affairs with a good understanding of the organisation, she served on the executive council,” said Gawanas. “By profession she is a doctor, a medical doctor. And also served in her country as Minister of Health. So she definitely brings with her a wealth of experience, apart from the fact that she also fought for the freedom in South Africa.”

Gender Discrimination Despite that, Commissioner Gawanas thinks being a woman will make the job harder for Dlamini-Zuma “As women, we always will experience discrimination,” she said. “”Some very direct, some very indirect. I think it will take a long time for men to be subordinate to a woman, in the sense that you will be a supervisor to men. When I came to the African Union, I definitely realized that it was a very bureaucratic institution; it was also a very male-dominated institution.”

Dlamini-Zuma does not seem fazed by being the first woman or the first South African to hold the post. She has said her main focus will be on making the African Union a stronger, efficient and more effective institution for the whole continent.

 

Feature Past Edition

African Matters


Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/visionaf/public_html/magazine/modules/mod_latestnews/helper.php on line 109
The Suspension of Nigeria CBN Governor is it constitutional?.
 

Explore what we do